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Flash for mobile phones

Flash for mobile phones

According to an article published this month in BBCNews, Adobe has announced a plan to try to expand the installation of its Flash player to more mobile devices and junction boxes.

The Dubbed Open Screen initiative places a number of restrictions on how its multimedia management software can be used.

Adobe will stop charging for its mobile versions of Flash and plans to release information about the inner workings of the code. In this way, Adobe hopes that its Flash technology will be as successful on mobile phones as it has on the Internet.

Adobe estimates that its Flash player is installed on more than 98% of Internet-connected desktop computers.

The Open Screen plan will be based on Flash Lite, a version of Adobe's multimedia player designed for mobile phones, which is already on millions of devices. The ultimate goal of the plan is to make it easier for those who make films and TV to send their content to mobiles and other devices such as connection boxes.
To do this, you will create a flexible playback technology capable of running on any small device, requiring only developers to write the code once.

Today, trying to get games or videos to different devices is often frustrating, due to the wide variety of peculiarities of the software and hardware of each device.

The four steps of Adobe's plan are to: eliminate the license fee, end restrictions on the use of SWF and FLV files, publish detailed information about your Flash player's program interfaces, and disclose information about your software technology. streaming for Flash.

This is a series of steps aimed at opening Flash in order to get more developers to work with it.

Adobe has signed on to be working with Arm, SonyEricsson, Nokia, LG, and other phone makers on the Open Screen initiative, as well as content partners like the BBC, MTV and NBC.

Source: BBC News


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