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Cheapest ski holidays

Cheapest ski holidays

How to reduce expenses when going skiing

1. Book with a tour operator

This year, booking with a tour operator instead of organizing our own trip is by far the cheapest way to go skiing, says Craig Burton, commercial director of the travel agency ifyouski.com. "Operators still have seats available from October to November that they need to sell, which means real bargains are possible and the later you book, the better the deals."

2. Avoid school holidays

If possible, avoid the school vacation week that begins February 14, says Andy Harmer, Neilson's director of product and marketing. Not only are the slopes overcrowded, but the price of the holidays will be higher given the limited availability, he adds, especially if there are also holidays in the country we are going to. For example, at the popular St Anton station in Austria, a week-long trip with half-board accommodation in a four-star hotel would cost 1,500 pounds / person (€ 1,593) on those dates; The same trip, booked for the following week, costs 925 pounds / person (982 €).

3. Reduce costs in parking

If you are driving to the airport, try to reserve the parking space in advance. For example, a week's stay for a car in the long-term parking area of ​​Heathrow Terminal 5 paying on the spot will cost £ 108.10 (€ 114.84), while booking 24 hours in advance at BAA It will cost us 57.70 pounds (€ 61.27). The Holiday Extras website allows you to reserve parking in advance at any UK airport. To save more, we can always ask a family member or friend to drive us.

4. Save on equipment

When renting skis or snowboards it is always cheaper to reserve them online in advance. You can save up to 40% by paying about £ 60 (€ 63.75) for a week instead of the usual around £ 100 (€ 106.26), Burton says. For newbies, it is better to borrow everything you need rather than buy it. If no one is known to ask, another option is to turn to thrift stores, says Jasmine Birtles of Moneymagpie.com.

5. Stay in one place

If we stay at a resort in one of the three valleys of the French Alps, how likely is it that we will go skiing in the other valleys? A six-day access pass for the three valleys costs € 225. It is much cheaper to buy one for the valley where we are going to be: for example, € 182 in Meribel.

6. Pay only for the time you ski

If we really like winter sun and white wine more than skiing, buy daily or even half-day passes. Access to the Meribel ski slopes costs € 31 for a morning or afternoon compared to € 38 for a full day.

7. Take a good look before buying insurance

Unless we have an annual travel insurance policy that includes winter sports, we will need to purchase one before leaving. In that case, look for special offers.

8. Take a sandwich to the top to eat

High-mountain restaurants are quite expensive, so bring food, Harmer cautions, especially if you're going to a country where the currency is stronger than ours.

9. Don't miss the last chairlift

If we miss the last chair lift to a point from which we can ski down to the station where we are staying, it will be expensive. Although our accommodation may be just a few hundred meters away in a straight line, getting there on a mountain road could take more than an hour and taxi drivers will benefit.

Source: The Guardian

Related Reading:

  • Skiing in europe
  • Skiing in Spain

Video: Ski holidays Tignes - winter holidays - ski deals - apres ski (September 2020).