General

Google loses copyright lawsuit

Google loses copyright lawsuit

According to an article published on February 13, 2007 in The Sydney Morning Gerald, a Belgian court has ruled that Google cannot reproduce excerpts from Belgian newspapers, something that could jeopardize one of the search engine's most popular services if other courts do the same. Copiepresse argues that versions of news articles stored on Google can be viewed on this service even after such articles are no longer freely accessible on the newspaper's website. Google has faced a similar demand from the Agence France Press in the US, which started a lawsuit against it in 2005. The Belgian court has upheld the existing requirement, but has reduced the penalty Google will face if it chooses to publish materials from a number of Belgian newspapers. Following a ruling in September, Google faced a possible fine of € 1 million for the reproduction of articles and was forced to publish the sentence or pay another € 500,000 a day. But this week the court has reduced the possible fine to 25,000 euros a day. Google has indicated that it disagrees with the ruling and has announced that it plans to appeal. In turn, Margaret Boribon, general secretary of Copiepresse, claims to be happy with the sentence, but has expressed surprise at the reduction of the possible fine. According to her, Copiepresse could still reconsider the possibility of allowing Google to publish excerpts from Belgian newspapers in exchange for an amount, although she notes that it is up to Google to initiate a negotiation or not. "The initial purpose was to reach a fair agreement," he says. Source: http://c.moreover.com/click/here.pl?r807046308


Video: Google+ Class Action Lawsuit, Google Settles out of Court for $ Million for Exposing Users Info (September 2020).